The High School Building: Can We Fix It?

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On September 18th, from 6pm to 8pm, renovational charrettes were held at the high school to discuss the building’s architectural future. An additional charrette was held on October 16th for the elementary school, and there is another charrette scheduled for November 20th for the middle school. However, Dr. Angelucci wants to focus first on the high school building rather than the others.

“Our attention needs to be at the high school,” said Dr. Angelucci, a day after the high school charrette meeting took place.

His reasoning for the high school being a priority is mostly due to how old the building itself actually is, and the outdated facilities that come with it.

He said, “There were renovations in 1992, and in 2005, and the building is starting to show its wear and tear.”

The renovations in 1992 were mostly infrastructural, while the renovations in 2005 added new aspects to the old building, like the new gym and weight room. Even with these modifications, Dr. Angelucci still thinks that there is plenty to fix up or completely change for the better.

He went on to say, “Things need to be done with wiring, infrastructure, supports, heating, ventilation, and the bathrooms.”

Dr. Angelucci confirmed that facilities like the bathrooms, ventilation, and heating are all part of the original building, which went up in the 1950’s.

Along with these changes, Dr. Angelucci calls for the building itself to reflect what Slippery Rock High actually is.

He states, “We have award-winning students, award-winning staff members, a teacher of the year who works in this very high school, a blue ribbon school, and we are nationally recognized for these achievements. I want our facilities to mirror all these things.”

He feels that Slippery Rock High is a “best kept secret” of the town.

“I don’t want it to be a secret,” Dr. Angelucci adds.

When asked for a general time frame as to when these renovations would start, he said, “A decision will be made by January or February of this academic year, and in about four years, the facilities here will hopefully have changed drastically for the better.”

He hopes by the time the 2020 graduating class finishes college that the school will look and feel drastically different for the better.